Steven Pomeroy

Author Archive

  • Apr 10, 2021
    (via Sixty Symbols) Professor Tony Padilla on life on a "donut planet" - leading to discussion about how the Earth and Moon formed.
  • Apr 10, 2021
    (via SciShow) Today, bones hold us up. But for ancient jawless fishes, bones may have been a way to store energy for long journeys. Plus, new research indicated that hippos and...
  • Apr 8, 2021
    (via SciShow) Forget lab rats — meet the Chinese or striped-back hamster, an unassuming little rodent whose role in research over the years has led to breakthroughs in...
  • Apr 8, 2021
    (via Seeker) As green technologies become more common, scientists are trying to 'green' the lithium-ion batteries that power them. One question being: can we innovate ways to reuse...
  • Apr 8, 2021
    (via Reactions) Forever chemicals are used in everything from rain jackets to jet fuel. But the chemistry behind what makes them useful also makes them stick around in the...
  • Apr 8, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Today, chilis are the most widely cultivated spice crop in the world - grown everywhere from their native home in the Americas to Europe, Africa, and Asia. But how and...
  • Apr 7, 2021
    (via SciShow) Why do cats love catnip so much? Researchers have found a possible evolutionary answer to this adorable feline phenomenon!
  • Apr 7, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) There’s one kind of planet we’ve found more often than any other in the universe so far: mini-Neptunes. Now, some scientists think they’ve...
  • Apr 7, 2021
    (via Deep Look) This fly’s larvae tunnel inside bitter-tasting greens like arugula and kale, leaving squiggly marks behind. The plants fight back with toxic chemicals. So...
  • Apr 7, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) You’ve probably heard about the supervolcano in Yellowstone. But did you know it’s one of three supervolcanoes in the United States? Can we prevent...
  • Apr 6, 2021
    (via TEDEd) It’s 1997. The United States Senate has called a hearing about global warming. Some expert witnesses point out that past periods in Earth’s history were...
  • Apr 6, 2021
     Journey to the Microcosmos describes how diatoms get their wondrous cells.
  • Apr 5, 2021
    CGP Grey uses a piece of metric paper to provide us a sense of scale of the Universe.
  • Apr 5, 2021
    (via SciShow) You might have wondered why bumblebees stop for a moment to stare at the flower they were just interacted with. Are they cherishing all the good times they had...
  • Apr 3, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) The FDA approved the first COVID vaccine for use in the United States only nine months to the day that the World Health Organization declared the disease a global...
  • Apr 3, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) The body can get a whole lot colder - but not a whole lot hotter - before we die. Why is that?
  • Apr 2, 2021
    (via SciShow) Fairies do exist! Well, sort of...meet the fairyfly, the smallest insect on Earth that specializes in the magic of miniaturization!
  • Apr 2, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Humans are fascinated by shiny stuff. Not only do we find these things attractive, but we also tend to perceive them as being high quality. Well, turns out this...
  • Apr 1, 2021
    (via Veritasium) How does order spontaneously arise out of chaos?
  • Apr 1, 2021
    Destin from Smarter Every Day is bamboozled by earthworms that are attracted to magnets.
  • Apr 1, 2021
    (via AsapSCIENCE) Penis size, taint size and sperm count are decreasing in men. This is the science of why!
  • Apr 1, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Neil Sloane from the OEIS has another number sequence which escalates quickly.
  • Mar 31, 2021
    (via SciShow) The ground under our feet is constantly moving, and to measure these movements, researchers have turned to an unlikely helper: quasars that are millions of light-years...
  • Mar 31, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) The Astrophysics Pioneers program is funding four innovative new missions that read like a best-hits album of the most exciting astronomical frontiers: from...
  • Mar 30, 2021
    (via SciShow) Improving batteries is a tough problem, but it’s also an important one because in many ways the future of our planet also depends on the future of batteries....
  • Mar 30, 2021
    (via Boston Dynamics) Meet Stretch, a prototype of our new robot designed to automate box moving tasks in warehouses and distribution centers. Stretch’s mobile base allows it...
  • Mar 27, 2021
    (via Veritasium) This video is about stuff: light bulbs, printers, phones and why they aren't better.
  • Mar 26, 2021
    Chernobyl, Fukushima, The Simpsons power plant, they all involve lies!
  • Mar 26, 2021
    (via SciShow) Vaccines teach your immune system to recognize pathogens, but sometimes your body needs a bit of a reminder.
  • Mar 26, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) In Parkinson's disease, certain kinds of neurons die over time, but it might be possible to reprogram other types of cells in the brain to replace those lost ones.
  • Mar 26, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) No other placental mammal that we know of prefers one side of the body so consistently, not even our closest primate relatives. But being right-handed may have deep...
  • Mar 25, 2021
    (via Deep Look) To find its place in the shade! Each hollowed-out seed is home to a head-banging moth larva, just trying to survive the harsh Sonoran Desert sun.
  • Mar 25, 2021
    A microscope expert shows off his blood.
  • Mar 24, 2021
    (via SciShow) Scientists think they’ve discovered some peaks taller than Mt Everest deep beneath the earth’s crust, and this range might be the key to one of the biggest...
  • Mar 24, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) From what we know about Titan, it seems like its atmosphere should have disappeared millions of years ago. So, why hasn’t it?
  • Mar 24, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) “A moving arrow is at rest.” This is obviously a nonsensical contradiction. But Zeno, a Greek philosopher famous for his metaphysical trolling,...
  • Mar 24, 2021
    (via Vox) In the US, the first two available Covid-19 vaccines were the ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. Both vaccines have very high "efficacy rates," of around 95%. But the...
  • Mar 23, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Historically, most cars have run on gasoline, but that doesn’t have to be the case in the future: other liquid fuels and electricity can also power cars. So what...
  • Mar 23, 2021
    (via SciShow) You might not think of a sea creature as helpful in the prevention of climate change, but sperm whales have been doing their part to cool the planet by doing what most...
  • Mar 23, 2021
    Backyard Scientist shows what happens when you pour molten aluminum from fifty feet high.
  • Mar 22, 2021
    (via Minute Physics) This video is about the "Kelvin wake" shape of water wakes behind boats - we talk about mach angle, dispersion, superposition of many waves, and how these all...
  • Mar 19, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) The cell nucleus is crucial to multicellular life, so you think science would have a good idea how it evolved. The truth is, we don't, but Scientists do have some...
  • Mar 19, 2021
    (via SpaceX) On March 3, Starship serial number 10 (SN10) completed SpaceX’s third high-altitude flight test of a Starship prototype as it successfully ascended, transitioned...
  • Mar 19, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Have you ever wondered why you feel better after a good, hearty sob? Well, it turns out the reasons are kind of a mystery, and they range from social support to...
  • Mar 19, 2021
    (via Vsauce2) Please don’t use a toaster in the bathtub. The combination of electricity and water will be too much for your heart. But why don’t fish have the same...
  • Mar 18, 2021
    (via SciShow) Our bones are multi-functional body builders, but perhaps their most mysterious function is the production of blood. Scientists now think they have a pretty good idea...
  • Mar 18, 2021
    (viaa It's Okay to Be Smart) Could humans ever evolve to have wings? Why don’t fish have propellers? Why don’t tigers have wheels? Why don’t zebras have laser...
  • Mar 18, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Earth isn't the only planet that gets rocked by giant tsunamis. In fact, giant waves on other planets have helped us solve a few mysteries about our solar system.
  • Mar 17, 2021
    (via TEDEd) No matter how we make electricity, it takes up space. Coal requires mines, and plants to convert it into electricity. Nuclear power takes uranium mines, facilities to...
  • Mar 17, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) I have good news and bad news. Bad news first: two years ago we reported on the Crisis in Cosmology. Since then, it’s only gotten worse. And actually, the...
  • Mar 17, 2021
    (via Vox) The world's tallest mountain just got a little taller — here's why.
  • Mar 17, 2021
    (via Veritasium) For thousands of years, mathematicians were calculating Pi the obvious but numerically inefficient way. Then Newton came along  and changed the game.
  • Mar 16, 2021
    (via TEDEd) As a breeze blows through the savannah, a snake-shaped tube stretches into the air and scans the horizon like a periscope. But it’s not seeing— it’s...
  • Mar 16, 2021
    (via SciShow) With their squishy bodies and color-changing abilities, octopuses and other cephalopods already look like our planet’s resident aliens. But researchers have...
  • Mar 15, 2021
    (via Periodic Videos) Senior technician Neil Barnes re-enacts a favourite experiment from his childhood, reacting aluminium and sodium hydroxide to produce hydrogen.
  • Mar 12, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) The golden ratio. Some say it’s the most mythical number in the universe. Others say it underlies everything from nature’s patterns to beauty...
  • Mar 12, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) There’s no doubt that lithium has a diverse list of uses. But the way that it interacts with our bodies to help treat bipolar disorder is aiding us in...
  • Mar 12, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) In order to truly understand differences among animal lifespans, we need to stop thinking about a specific number and start thinking about a distribution.
  • Mar 11, 2021
    (via PBS Deep Look) Female aphids are the matriarchs of a successful family operation— taking over your garden. But don’t lose hope; these pests have some serious...
  • Mar 11, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) We know that gravity exerts its pull on light, and we have an explanation for why. Actually, we have multiple explanations that all predict the same thing. And...
  • Mar 11, 2021
    (via SciShow) It seems like a simple question with a straightforward answer, but when you look at the total environmental impact of each type of bag, things start to get a little...
  • Mar 11, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Kit Yates explains how he calculated that all the SARS-CoV-2 in the world would fit inside a Coke can - and discusses "Fermi Estimates".
  • Mar 10, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) At first glance, a cashless society sounds appealing: no hassle, quick purchase, and freedom from dirty pieces of paper. But what are the downsides?
  • Mar 10, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) Everything that powers our modern lifestyle—electric cars, smartphones, even wind turbines—requires minerals extracted from the earth. Minerals are...
  • Mar 10, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Let us explore the scientific mystery of what would happen to you, if Earth suddenly turned into gold! The “Midaspocalypse”, based on the ancient tale of...
  • Mar 10, 2021
    (via SciShow) One might not think that snow could help anything stay warm through a harsh winter, but these tiny bats have found a way to utilize the insulation provided by the snow:...
  • Mar 9, 2021
    Jade from Up and Atom explains a paradox about infinity.
  • Mar 9, 2021
    (via SciShow) Seasonal illnesses from infectious diseases aren’t a new concept, but a few decades ago public health experts began to notice the same behavior in some...
  • Mar 8, 2021
    (via SciShow) We often think of the ocean as a pretty serene, lovely place to relax. But it turns out there's quite a racket going on under the waves, and some of the culprits are...
  • Mar 5, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Fast food was invented to help us keep up with our fast-paced world. But it’s also had some unintended psychological consequences and can influence our...
  • Mar 4, 2021
    SpaceX's SN10 Starship stuck its landing today after launching to a height of ten kilometers. It subsequently exploded.
  • Mar 3, 2021
    (via Minute Physics) This video is about how physics dictates the design of modern windmills - why they are so big, have so few blades, and have such skinny blades.
  • Mar 3, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Most of the universe is made up of dark matter, so could it form into stars and galaxies like regular matter?
  • Mar 2, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Today roads, sidewalks, bridges, and skyscrapers are made of a material called concrete. There’s three tons of it for every person on Earth. It’s also played...
  • Feb 26, 2021
    (via SciShow) You might think that you’re pretty familiar with your body, but it turns out that our bodies still have some surprises for us!
  • Feb 25, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) We know that gravity must cause clocks to run slow on the basis of logical consistency. And we know that gravity DOES cause clocks to run slow based on many...
  • Feb 25, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Our DNA holds thousands of dead genes and we’ve only just begun to unravel their stories. But one thing is already clear: we’re not just defined by the...
  • Feb 24, 2021
    (via SciShow) If you’re lucky enough to witness a panda applying a ripe layer of horse poop body paint to itself, you might assume it is a similar behavior to a dog frolicking...
  • Feb 24, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) In space we can finally get away from pesky flies landing in our drinks! But before we can live off-Earth full time, sending flies into orbit is helping us study...
  • Feb 23, 2021
    (via NASA) NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance mission captured thrilling footage of its rover landing in Mars' Jezero Crater on Feb. 18, 2021. The real footage in this video was captured...
  • Feb 23, 2021
    (via Microcosmos) As the search for alternative energy sources continues, scientists are looking to the microcosmos and wondering: Can we use algae oil to power our cars, our...
  • Feb 22, 2021
    Destin from Smarter Every day digs in to how nuclear submarines make oxygen for their crews.
  • Feb 19, 2021
    (via Minute Physics) This video covers the General theory of Relativity, developed by Albert Einstein, from basic simple levels (it's gravity, curved space) through to the concepts...
  • Feb 19, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Robots of the future may be softer, squishier and bendier than robots today. This could make them ideal for space exploration.
  • Feb 19, 2021
    (via SciShow) For upside-down mirrors, super hot volcanic chimneys, and neon rocks with living microorganisms, look no further than the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California.
  • Feb 19, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Different dogs look incredibly different - but that doesn't mean they are necessarily more diverse.
  • Feb 18, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) It was pretty impressive when LIGO detected gravitational waves from colliding black holes. Well we’ve just taken that to the next level with a...
  • Feb 18, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) The biggest turtle ever described wasn’t an ancestor of today’s leatherback turtles or any other living sea turtles. But it looks like there are some...
  • Feb 17, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Since 1850, global average temperatures have risen by 1 degree Celsius. That may not sound like a lot, but it is. Why? 1 degree is an average. Many places have already...
  • Feb 16, 2021
    (via Mark Rober) This will be cooler than the Super Bowl. Thanks to Bill and Melinda Gates for partnering with me on this video.
  • Feb 16, 2021
    (via SciShow) Seymour might have had better luck had he raised one of these Bornean plants instead of a giant Venus flytrap. Instead of evolving to eat animals, they’ve evolved...
  • Feb 16, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) When is now? Seems like a pretty simple question… just look at your watch. But do you and I share the same “now”? Let’s journey...
  • Feb 15, 2021
    (via Mental Floss) Evolution is a complex process. Natural selection, "survival of the fittest," that one image where the monkeys slowly turn into a human... what does it all mean??...
  • Feb 13, 2021
    (via SciShow) Near the end of 2020, we got some puzzling but good news: COVID-19 fatality rates have been dropping. Here are a few factors that might help explain why we’re...
  • Feb 13, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Certain cognitive biases cause humans to make unsafe decisions in a pandemic, making a terrible disease even worse.
  • Feb 13, 2021
    (via NASA JPL) All landings on Mars are difficult, but NASA's Perseverance rover is attempting to touch down in the most challenging terrain on Mars ever targeted.
  • Feb 13, 2021
    (via Vox) Big, expensive highway expansion projects are the source of a lot US transportation funding — but they aren't a silver bullet for congestion relief. In communities...
  • Feb 12, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) The evolution of our ability to speak is its own epic saga and it’s worth pausing to appreciate that. It’s taken several million years to get to this...
  • Feb 11, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) There’s a deep connection between gravity and time - gravitational fields seem to slow the pace of time in what we call gravitational time dilation. And...
  • Feb 10, 2021
    (via SciShow) Why can amphibians, fish and even some reptiles regenerate limbs, while birds and mammals can’t? Researchers think they might have found a clue on the tip of the...
  • Feb 10, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Most galaxies that we know of are spirals, including the Milky Way, but how do they form and keep their shape over billions of years?
  • Feb 10, 2021
    Jade from Up and Atom delves into the Dark Sky paradox.
  • Feb 9, 2021
    (via SciShow) You would think that almost everyone has the same exact number of bones in their body, but that number is different, and changing, in everyone!
  • Feb 8, 2021
    (via Mark Rober) My Field Goal Kicking Robot v. the NFL longest field goal record holder Matt Prater.
  • Feb 5, 2021
    (via Veritasium) I got the chance to interview Bill Gates so I asked him: Will Covid-19 be the last pandemic? How does he deal with misinformation and conspiracy theories? And what...
  • Feb 5, 2021
    (via TEDEd) It may not appear very lively six feet underground, but a single teaspoon of soil contains more organisms than there are human beings on the planet. From bacteria and...
  • Feb 5, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Since the start of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, the term “herd immunity” has been all over the news. But what does it really mean? One...
  • Feb 4, 2021
    (via SciShow) So, moose licking cars in winter is a thing, if you live in a place that has both moose and winter. But why on earth do they do this?!
  • Feb 3, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Nuclear energy creates an uneasy feeling of danger for many people: ancient and dangerous minerals are concentrated to awaken seemingly unnatural powers, creating...
  • Feb 3, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) In the 1800s, William Parsons built a telescope larger than any in the world: The Leviathan of Parsonstown. This landmark in science history helped solve the...
  • Feb 3, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Explore what would happen if all of humanity’s satellites disappeared and the real-life scenarios that could lead to such a catastrophe.
  • Feb 2, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Under the right conditions, wildfires can form clouds and generate firestorms, which last far longer than normal thunderstorms.
  • Feb 2, 2021
    Pelomyxa are giant amoeba capable of growing as much as five millimeters in length.
  • Feb 2, 2021
    (via Boston Dynamics) Now that Spot has an arm in addition to legs and cameras, it can do mobile manipulation. It finds and picks up objects (trash), tidies up the living room, opens...
  • Feb 1, 2021
    Tim Harford explains a few annoying puzzles.
  • Feb 1, 2021
    Destin from Smarter Every Day explains the complicated steps to landing on the Moon.
  • Feb 1, 2021
    Hank Green describes five incredible miniature robots.
  • Feb 1, 2021
    (via Healthcare Triage) Reports have surfaced of individuals being re-infected with Covid-19, raising questions about immunity via natural infection as well as questions about the...
  • Jan 29, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) By the time you've read this, a billion billion dark matter particles may have streamed through your body like ghosts. The particle or particles of the dark...
  • Jan 29, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Our DNA holds evidence of a huge, ancient pandemic, one that touched many different species, spanned the globe, and lasted for more than 15 million years.
  • Jan 28, 2021
    (via Veritasium) What are these electric blue ponds in the middle of the Utah desert? And why do they keep changing color?
  • Jan 28, 2021
    (via Vox) In the 1780s, a charismatic healer caused a stir in Paris.
  • Jan 27, 2021
    (via Deep Look) Two tiny mites duke it out on strawberry plants throughout California. One is a spider mite that sucks the juices out of the delicious crop and destroys it. The...
  • Jan 26, 2021
    (via Big Think) The universe is expanding faster and faster. Whether this acceleration will end in a Big Rip or will reverse and contract into a Big Crunch is not yet understood, and...
  • Jan 26, 2021
    (via SciShow) Geologists have a few ideas as to how rain affects mountains. But could rain also help mountains grow?
  • Jan 25, 2021
    (via SciShow) You may be aware of certain hacks to sober up, but researchers have found a way to actually get booze out of our systems faster. And this discovery could help first...
  • Jan 22, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) This ancient species had the same six legs and segmented body that we’d recognize from an ant today. But it also had a huge, scythe-like jaw and a horn coming...
  • Jan 22, 2021
    (via SciShow) We humans can rely on our internal body heat to help keep us warm. But what can cold-blooded animals do when faced with the threat of freezing? Here are three creatures...
  • Jan 21, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) This little pygmy gecko has an amazing superpower, that helps it survive in the wet season.
  • Jan 20, 2021
    (via SciShow) You probably don't consider algae to be super aggressive, but 66 million years ago had to turn to murder in order to survive.
  • Jan 20, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) We can learn a lot about our galaxy by looking to the stars, but we can also reveal a lot about our cosmic history from... Dead trees?
  • Jan 20, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Today we’re going to delve into a couple of the most famous paradoxes of special relativity: the Twin Paradox, The Ladder Paradox (aka the Barn-Pole...
  • Jan 19, 2021
    Eric Lander discusses how quasiperfect numbers gave him a start...
  • Jan 19, 2021
    We’ve scoured the data for you when it comes to Vitamin D supplements, coming up empty-handed almost every time. We know it doesn’t help with a variety of conditions,...
  • Jan 15, 2021
    (via minutephysics) This video is about how cheap, fast, and LESS sensitive rapid antigen tests might be better for screening (& maybe surveillance) than PCR COVID tests due to...
  • Jan 15, 2021
    (via SciShow) Octopuses and other cephalopods can squirt ink when threatened, but the forms the ink takes can go way beyond your typical smokescreen.
  • Jan 14, 2021
    A bioluminescent microbe saved astronaut Jim Lovell. Meet the dinoflagellate.
  • Jan 14, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) It’s important to us that you understand how big this beaver was. Just like modern beavers, it was semiaquatic -- it lived both on the land and in the water. The...
  • Jan 14, 2021
    (via Deep Look) California oak moth caterpillars eat all the leaves on an oak, leaving a brown skeleton. Then they rappel down on a strand of silk, twirling and swinging. If you were...
  • Jan 13, 2021
    (via SciShow) Plants need light to survive. But apparently, that doesn't have to be sunlight.
  • Jan 13, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Humans have been using microbes to separate minerals from mud since the middle of the last century, so we know biomining works on earth. But how will these tiny...
  • Jan 13, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Since the very beginning of quantum mechanics, a debate has raged about how to interpret its bizarre predictions. And at the heart and origin of that debate is...
  • Jan 12, 2021
    (via NASA Goddard) One of the Hubble Space Telescope’s most iconic images is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, which unveiled myriad galaxies across the universe, stretching back to...
  • Jan 12, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Everyone lies. Even you and even me. We lie about small things and we lie about big things. We lie to help ourselves and we lie to protect others....
  • Jan 9, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Exoplanets have taught us a lot more about planets than our solar system could ever teach us, from what happens when they’re born, to what happens when...
  • Jan 8, 2021
    (via SciShow) You might think the white patches that grow on whale’s heads and faces are just weird skin growths, and you’re not wrong. But when you look closer, these...
  • Jan 8, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Sometimes you hear music and you automatically tap your foot, or do a little dance, or walk to the beat. What’s happening in your brain that makes your body...
  • Jan 6, 2021
    (via SciShow) Can you actually drink that steaming mug of snake venom? The science comes down to the difference between poisons and venoms, and to the oral toxicity of the venom...
  • Jan 5, 2021
    (via Quanta) The Riemann hypothesis is the most notorious unsolved problem in all of mathematics. Ever since it was first proposed by Bernhard Riemann in 1859, the conjecture has...
  • Jan 5, 2021
    (via Microcosmos) Bacterial flagella are very hard to spot in our footage, but we see evidence of them in almost every single one of our videos. The question is, how do they work,...
  • Jan 4, 2021
    (via SciShow) From medieval knights to face shields, humans are pretty big fans of armor. But it turns out that other organisms use armor, too! Except sometimes, their armor...
  • Jan 1, 2021
    (via Seeker) When you think of the Plague, the Black Death of the 14th century, with its medieval cities overrun with rats and creepy plague masks, probably comes to mind. But the...
  • Jan 1, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Ames window illusion illustrates how we don't directly perceive external reality.