Steven Pomeroy

Author Archive

  • Oct 22, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) It looks like the evolution of ocean-going whales like Borealodon may have affected communities found in the deep ocean, like the ones found around geothermal vents....
  • Oct 22, 2021
    (via PBS Terra) To this day, the crater of Mt. St. Helens volcano remains a place of immense danger and strictly off-limits to the public — avalanches, crevasses, poison gas,...
  • Oct 22, 2021
    (via SciShow) In the past couple years, you may have found yourself wishing that all the viruses in the world just disappear. But be careful what you wish for...
  • Oct 22, 2021
    Henry Reich from Minute Physics rants about the butterfly effect.
  • Oct 21, 2021
    (via NASA Goddard) The surface of Venus is completely inhospitable for life: barren, dry, crushed under an atmosphere about 90 times the pressure of Earth’s and roasted by...
  • Oct 21, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) How can sand, blown by the wind, form such intricate and beautiful patterns as ripples and dunes? The answer is a surprising secret of self-organization....
  • Oct 21, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) The people behind the greatest leaps in physics - Einstein, Newton, Heisenberg, all had the uncanny ability to see the fundamentals - see the deepest, underlying...
  • Oct 20, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Your antivirus squad is up against a code that’s hijacked your mainframe. What you’ve learned from other infected systems, right before they went dark, is...
  • Oct 20, 2021
    (via SciShow) Rocks or mineral crystals can often remind us of other things in our daily lives, but coming across some of THESE rocks might be one of the creepiest experiences a...
  • Oct 18, 2021
    (via Veritasium) This is a #robot that walks, flies, #skateboards, #slacklines, and might do much more one day.
  • Oct 16, 2021
    (via Physics Girl) How is it possible for galaxies and objects in space to move away from us faster than the speed of light? Will we ever see those objects?
  • Oct 14, 2021
  • Oct 14, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Paradoxically, the most promising prospects for moving matter around faster than light may be to put a metaphorical brick wall in its way. New efforts in quantum...
  • Oct 13, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) The past is a vast and mysterious land that begins at the big bang and ends in the present, expanding with each passing moment. It is the home of everything that...
  • Oct 13, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) When you think of a frozen object in space, you might think of Pluto, but stars themselves actually freeze.
  • Oct 13, 2021
    (via Deep Look) Tadpole shrimp are neither tadpoles nor shrimp. They're time-traveling crustaceans called triops. Their eggs can spend years – even decades – frozen in...
  • Oct 9, 2021
    Two ocean worms fight with their double-pronged penises.
  • Oct 9, 2021
    (via TED) Doubling human life expectancy in a century is our greatest achievement, says author Steven Johnson. How did we make it happen -- and can we keep it going? Backed by...
  • Oct 9, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) For decades, scientists believed dinosaurs were diurnal and tiny mammals were nocturnal. But as researchers have uncovered more mammalian fossils and studied the...
  • Oct 7, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) What happens if you cut a bar magnetic in half? We get two magnets, each with their own North and South poles. But what happens if you keep on cutting, into...
  • Oct 7, 2021
    (via TED) Your belly and your brain speak to each other, says obesity researcher Mads Tang-Christensen. Offering scientific proof that obesity is a disease influenced by genetics and...
  • Oct 6, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Inside our cells, each of us has a second set of genes completely separate from our 23 pairs of chromosomes. And this isn’t just true for humans— it’s...
  • Oct 6, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) Regardless of whether you’re rich or poor, your standard of living is vastly higher than it was half a century ago. During those 50 years, Americans’...
  • Oct 5, 2021
    (via Smarter Every Day) I greatly appreciate Dr. John Mather's time and patience with me. He did a fantastic job of breaking down the design of the telescope.
  • Oct 5, 2021
     (via NewScientist) Saildrone has captured footage from inside Hurricane Sam. The 23-foot sailed into the Category 4 storm to collect data and this dramatic footage.
  • Oct 2, 2021
    (via Vox) The nuclear power dilemma, explained.
  • Oct 1, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Your genetic code is probably already in a database, without you ever giving a sample or permission.
  • Oct 1, 2021
    (via AsapSCIENCE) There are ALOT of stereotypes for us gingers, and the scientific truth is even weirder!
  • Sep 30, 2021
    (via Periodic Videos) We dunk various samples of red-hot glass into cold water.
  • Sep 30, 2021
    (via Reactions) This week we show you how two simple changes can turn cardboard-y pizza into award winning pie (okay, award-winning might be a slight exaggeration, but we awarded...
  • Sep 29, 2021
    (via PBS Deep Look) Under the bright yellow petals of a tarweed plant, an insect known as the assassin bug kills its caterpillar victim by stabbing it over and over. But does this...
  • Sep 27, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Bowling has been reinvented many times over the past seven thousand years but especially in the last 30. This is the fascinating physics of balls, oil, lane and pins.
  • Sep 27, 2021
    (via SciShow) A shark's teeth usually says "stay away", but we can learn a lot from them, including what type of parents they were.
  • Sep 25, 2021
    Jade describes a paradoxical object that has finite volume but infinite surface area.
  • Sep 25, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) The current hurricane category scale doesn’t accurately convey the danger of a storm, because it doesn’t account for a hurricane's most destructive...
  • Sep 25, 2021
    (via Vox) A huge number of people still heat their homes with fossil fuels. There’s a better way.
  • Sep 24, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Smuggling yourself aboard the rogue submarine was the easy part. Hacking into the nuclear missile launch override — a little harder. And you’ve got a problem:...
  • Sep 24, 2021
    (via SciShow) Strawberries are delicious, but for a molecular biologist, they're also very difficult.
  • Sep 24, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) The Toba supervolcano was the biggest explosive eruption of the last 2.5 million years. And humans were around to see it, or at least feel its effects! But what were...
  • Sep 23, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Never before in human history have we been richer, more advanced or powerful. And yet we feel overwhelmed in the face of rapid climate change. It seems simple on the...
  • Sep 23, 2021
    A third dice trick with Ben Sparks - see the trilogy of tricks at: https://bit.ly/Dice_Trilogy
  • Sep 23, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) How do zebras get their stripes? How do leopards get their spots? And how do giraffes get their giraffe-shaped thingies, whatever they are called? Would...
  • Sep 22, 2021
    (via Vox) Making clean energy isn’t enough: We also have to move it.
  • Sep 22, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Today I’m going to explain why you’re not falling through your chair right now using one simple fact, and one object. The fact is that all electrons...
  • Sep 22, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) Is there anything that we take for granted more than water? The average American uses 82 gallons a day at home. And yet most of us never stop to think about where...
  • Sep 19, 2021
    (via Healthcare Triage) Today we're talking about Wegovy, which is a new prescription drug approved to treat obesity. It's also called semaglutide, and it was initially approved to...
  • Sep 17, 2021
    (via TEDEd) While searching for a kidney donor, Karen Keegan stumbled upon a mystery. After undergoing genetic testing, it turned out that some of her cells had a completely...
  • Sep 17, 2021
    (via SciShow) We're generally taught that chromosomes determine an animal's sex, but it is way more nuanced than that.
  • Sep 17, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Lots of global problems seem intractable, but there’s a formula for success that we can follow.
  • Sep 17, 2021
    (via Mark Rober) When life gives you lemons... build a 5 ton flask and blast them to space.
  • Sep 16, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) When you think of a brain, you probably imagine that pink, wrinkly organ in your skull, but we don’t have to stop there! Neither the brain’s...
  • Sep 15, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Explore the phenomenon and uses of chlorophyll fluorescence, a small amount of light emitted by plants during photosynthesis.
  • Sep 15, 2021
    Ultraviolet light makes the Microcosmos glow, but it also makes microbes blow up.
  • Sep 13, 2021
    (via Healthcare Triage) Interest in the antiparasitic drug Ivermectin has increased drastically as of late thanks to the belief that it can help to prevent and/or treat Covid-19. In...
  • Sep 10, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Johnny Ball is back talking about Hippocrates, Lunes, and a Fancy Q.
  • Sep 10, 2021
    (via Vox) The Anishnaabe, or Ojibwe, have lived on the land we now call Minnesota since long before European settlers arrived. For as long as they can remember, their lives have been...
  • Sep 9, 2021
    Hank Green explores one of the great mysteries of glass.
  • Sep 8, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) You’re alive right now… at least I’m pretty sure you are. But you’re not TOTALLY alive. Bits of you are always breaking down,...
  • Sep 7, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Under UV light, almost all species of scorpions glow a bright green color, but why?
  • Sep 3, 2021
    (via Physics Girl) We visited a giant field of solar mirrors to learn about Concentrated #Solar Power technology! Thank you to Toyota for lending us the Mirai and for sponsoring this...
  • Sep 3, 2021
    Journey to the Microcosmos presents the strange history of brine fish, also known as se monkeys.
  • Sep 2, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Toxodon was one of the last members of a lineage that vanished 11,000 years ago after thriving in isolation for millions of years. And its fossils would inspire a...
  • Sep 1, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Tiny particles from distant galaxies have caused plane accidents, election interference and game glitches.
  • Sep 1, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Hidden in the microverse all around you, there is a merciless war being fought by the true rulers of this planet, microorganisms.
  • Sep 1, 2021
    (via SciShow) In the Zagros Mountains of Iran lie some strange, multi-colored glaciers that don’t melt, even in the heat of summer. But, in a rainstorm, these glaciers will...
  • Sep 1, 2021
    (via TEDEd) In 1980, Paul Ehrlich and Julian Simon bet $1,000 on a question with stakes that couldn’t be higher: would the earth run out of resources to sustain a growing human...
  • Aug 27, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Prevailing for around 270 million years and encompassing more than 20,000 distinct species, trilobites are some of the most successful lifeforms in Earth’s history....
  • Aug 27, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Our bodies grow wrinklier as we age, but our brains are wrinklier long before that, and those wrinkles help us do all the things we love to do.
  • Aug 26, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) The story of how the starfish got its arms reminds us that even animals that might be familiar to us today can have incredibly deep histories - ones that stretch back...
  • Aug 25, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Matt Henderson is making lightning in mazes.
  • Aug 25, 2021
    (via Healthcare Triage) What's the deal with Covid variants? How well do the different Covid vaccines protect against the several variants? Today we'll tell you about the several...
  • Aug 25, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) The universe is going to end. But of all the possible ends of the universe vacuum decay would have to be the most thorough - because it could totally rewrite the...
  • Aug 24, 2021
    (via minutephysics) This video is about Bell's Spaceship Paradox of Special Relativity, wherein a pair of rockets (or spacecraft) connected by a weak thread accelerate with uniform...
  • Aug 24, 2021
    (via SciShow) We recently got an important update from the IPCC, the definitive source on the climate crisis. And while there's not a ton of good news, there are some bits of hope if...
  • Aug 24, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Sharks wouldn’t be known for their fierce teeth today if it weren’t for their ancient scales.
  • Aug 24, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Dig into the slippery slope fallacy, which assumes that one step will lead to a series of events that lead to an extreme— often bad— scenario.
  • Aug 18, 2021
    (via TEDEd) In the 20th century, most vaccines took over a decade to research, test, and produce. But the vaccines for COVID-19 were cleared for emergency use in less than 11 months....
  • Aug 16, 2021
    (via Vox) Birds, mammals, and fish are miniaturizing as temperatures rise. Why?
  • Aug 16, 2021
    (via Healthcare Triage) Alcoholics Anonymous has long been a treatment for alcoholism, and many, many addiction experts and people in recovery swear by the 12 step process. But what...
  • Aug 14, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) The remains of medium-sized predatory dinosaurs are pretty rare in places where giant predators like T. rex existed. Which is weird, because that’s just not how...
  • Aug 13, 2021
    (via Veritasium) 3D printed rockets save on up front tooling, enable rapid iteration, decrease part count, and facilitate radically new designs.
  • Aug 13, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Straddling Virginia and North Carolina is an area that was once described as the “most repulsive of American possessions.” By 1728, it was known as the Great...
  • Aug 13, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Remote mental health services have been around for a while, long before the pandemic. So, we've had plenty of time to study how well they work, and there are some...
  • Aug 12, 2021
    (via Deep Look) It might seem peculiar to see bees at the beach. But the bumblebee-mimic digger bee (Anthophora bomboides stanfordiana) makes its home at beaches in Northern...
  • Aug 12, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) There’s way too much plastic in the world’s oceans—which has led for calls to ban plastic on land. But that misses an important detail: the...
  • Aug 11, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Once every century, the world’s greatest spiders gather to compete in a series of grueling games. The winner will become the next arachnomonarch, able to command...
  • Aug 11, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) The human immune system is the most complex biological system we know, after the human brain, and yet, most of us never learn how it works. Or what it is. Your...
  • Aug 11, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Space Clue: 203 Pompeja and 269 Justitia in the asteroid belt with evidence of being formed outside of it. But the real mystery is how they got there! And we...
  • Aug 11, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) In the Many Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, the universal wavefunction is the reality, encompassing all possible histories and futures and all exist....
  • Aug 10, 2021
    (via SciShow) If you take a look at a map of Scotland, you'll notice an eerily straight line running through the highlands, this is the Great Glen Fault the product of half a billion...
  • Aug 9, 2021
    (via TEDEd) In 2011, a group of researchers conducted a study designed to find an impossible result. Their study involved real people, truthfully reported data, and commonplace...
  • Aug 5, 2021
    (via Reactions) You’ve heard of the epoxy hot dog, but how about the epoxy strawberry? On this week’s episode we’re going to try to make a strawberry last forever.
  • Aug 4, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) Even among giant cuttlefish, it's not all about size.
  • Aug 4, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) The largest things in the universe are black holes. In contrast to things like planets or stars they have no physical size limit, and can literally grow endlessly.
  • Aug 4, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) A new white dwarf has been discovered (poetically named: ZTF J1901+1458) that’s doing some stuff that no white dwarf should ever be able to do.
  • Jul 31, 2021
    (via Veritasium) The Collatz Conjecture is the simplest math problem no one can solve — it is easy enough for almost anyone to understand but notoriously difficult to solve.
  • Jul 31, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Why does sex exist? You might think the obvious answer is “reproduction” but there are plenty of organisms on Earth that don’t require...
  • Jul 30, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) A smooth stingray attempts to take advantage of a cast of defenceless and freshly moulted spider crabs.
  • Jul 30, 2021
    (via SciShow) Nuclear energy has a bit of a bad rap, but there's an element out there that might make them safer and more efficient.
  • Jul 30, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) It’s not just how much you take in; it’s how fast your body can purge it.
  • Jul 30, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) The Wrangel Island mammoths would end up being the final survivors of a once-widespread genus. In their final years, after having thrived in many parts of the world...
  • Jul 29, 2021
    Jade from Up and Atom describes Berry's Paradox and other logical curiosities.
  • Jul 29, 2021
    (via Freethink) Could robotic dolphins help marine parks become more humane spaces where people can learn about and connect with nature? Edge Innovations thinks so.
  • Jul 28, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) Three Mile Island. Chernobyl. Fukushima. When you think nuclear power, you probably think ‘danger.’ It’s a common impulse. And it’s...
  • Jul 27, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Matt Henderson shows us a few animations he created to depict chaos.
  • Jul 27, 2021
    Mark Rober shows off a robot that lays dominoes in intricate patterns.
  • Jul 26, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) As it floats on the surface of the ocean, the Man O' War looks beautiful and harmless but packs a killer sting with its deadly tentacles.
  • Jul 26, 2021
    (via AsapSCIENCE) The prehistoric paradox that scientists just solved
  • Jul 26, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) For a long time, scientists considered the neocortex the brainiest part of the human brain – an obvious candidate for the thing that makes us unique. But in...
  • Jul 22, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Seemingly distant ecosystems, even half a world apart, are connected in surprising ways. In this special limited series, Emily Graslie and Trace Dominguez...
  • Jul 22, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Many Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics proposes that every time a quantum event gets decided, the universe splits so that every possible outcome really...
  • Jul 22, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Lots of the traits we think of as defining us as mammals show up pretty early, during the time of the dinosaurs. And, in some cases, they show up a lot earlier and in...
  • Jul 21, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Explore Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem, a discovery which changed what we know about mathematical proofs and statements.
  • Jul 20, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Ben Sparks with another trick - can you guess how it works before he explains it?
  • Jul 20, 2021
    Journey to the Microcosmos shows off the microbes living in your drains.
  • Jul 19, 2021
    (via Periodic Videos) Chicken legs in chromic acid - plus we re-visit sulfuric acid with a new approach.
  • Jul 16, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) This specialist hunter knows just how dangerous their prey can be. To solve this problem, they hypnotise crabs by changing the colour of their skin.
  • Jul 16, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) We need more solutions for our energy needs, and one idea is straight out of science fiction: Solar panels, in space.
  • Jul 16, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) The Greek philosopher Aristotle used sensory experiences and body parts to propose that humans have five senses. But almost as soon as he proposed them, people...
  • Jul 15, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) At Tanque Loma, at least 22 giant ground sloths in the genus Eremotherium met their end. Of the five hypotheses that researchers proposed for what killed the sloths,...
  • Jul 15, 2021
    (via Mark Rober) We investigated some shark myths like why do Sharks attack GoPros.
  • Jul 14, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Get to know one of the most infamous scientific rivalries in history, known as the Bone Wars, where two scientists competed to find dinosaur fossils.
  • Jul 14, 2021
    (via SciShow) Koalas are pretty darn cute, but...they aren’t the brightest bulb on the continent. They will only eat eucalyptus leaves off the branch. On a plate, a koala...
  • Jul 14, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Many Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics proposes that every time a quantum event gets decided, the universe splits so that every possible outcome really...
  • Jul 12, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) At the bottom of the ocean, there are brine pools that have a salinity level three - eight times the usual sea level. When a Cutthroat eel gets too close it goes into...
  • Jul 12, 2021
    (via Virgin Galactic) "To all you kids down there..." - Richard Branson's message from zero gravity. #Unity22
  • Jul 10, 2021
    (via Veritasium) You are not a visual learner — learning styles are a stubborn myth. Part of this video is sponsored by Google Search.
  • Jul 10, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Optimal foraging theory means that turning down food is sometimes more efficient than eating it - but even then, what’s “wasted” doesn’t...
  • Jul 9, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Seemingly distant ecosystems, even half a world apart, are connected in surprising ways. In this special limited series, Emily Graslie and Trace Dominguez...
  • Jul 9, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Flinching in response to an unexpected loud noise might not be pleasant, but it's also not a problem for most people. For one family, however, getting startled...
  • Jul 8, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Quantum mechanics has a lot of weird stuff - but there’s thing that everyone agrees that no one understands. I’m talking about quantum spin....
  • Jul 7, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Leaving earth to find new homes in space is an old dream of humanity and will sooner or later be necessary for our survival. The planet that gets the most attention...
  • Jul 7, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Towering 85 meters above the Norwegian countryside, Mjøstårnet is the world’s tallest wooden building, made almost entirely from the trees of...
  • Jul 7, 2021
    (via SciShow) Scientists have observed a new parasitic behavior between a wasp and a social species of spider, where the spider re-learned an ancestral behavior!
  • Jul 6, 2021
    (via SciShow) The aptly named White Sands National Park is home to over 400 square kilometers of blindingly white sand. It's the culmination of a remarkable 250 million year process...
  • Jul 6, 2021
    With their upgraded microscope, Microcosmos gets up close and personal with a hydra.
  • Jul 3, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Fevers are one of our best weapons against infections, but they don't work like you might think.
  • Jul 1, 2021
    (via Veritasium) A UCLA Physics Professor bet me $10,000 that my video about going downwind faster than the wind was wrong.
  • Jul 1, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Hold on to your butts. This episode is about… butts. The science and evolutionary history of your rear end, the down-low on your derriere, shining...
  • Jun 30, 2021
    (via SciShow) The oceans absorb a lot of CO2, leading to a variety of effects like ocean acidification. But you might not expect one of those effects: stronger lightning strikes.
  • Jun 30, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) One of the hardest places to explore in space is actually pretty close, some call it the ignorosphere.
  • Jun 30, 2021
    (via Microcosmos) Sometimes we come across microbes that we just can't learn much about, or that don't fit into a larger story. So, this week we're sharing a few of those mysterious...
  • Jun 26, 2021
    (via AsapSCIENCE) How does your brain work? These simple puzzles will reveal a lot!
  • Jun 26, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) The effects of dark matter on galaxies is a mystifying and difficult thing to study, but the Milky Way's galactic bar might present an exciting way to quantify...
  • Jun 26, 2021
    Backyard Scientist touches the world's most painful plant.
  • Jun 25, 2021
    (via TEDEd) You and your best friend Bill are the greatest bards in the kingdom— but maybe not the brightest. Your hit song has insulted the king and now you’re slated...
  • Jun 25, 2021
    (via SciShow) You may not think much about moss, but it has a hidden super power, and it's been used to save countless lives.
  • Jun 25, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) By analyzing survivorship curves over the centuries, we can learn what’s changed about how - and when - humans die.
  • Jun 24, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Entropy is surely one of the most perplexing concepts in physics. It’s variously described as a measure of a system’s disorder - or as the amount of...
  • Jun 23, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Discover the extraordinary regenerative powers of the axolotl, a salamander native to Mexico and one of science’s most studied animals.
  • Jun 23, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Scientists have long been looking for a loophole for getting past the speed of light, and they might be one step closer to achieving that.
  • Jun 21, 2021
    (via SciShow) There are lots of unsolved mysteries in the world of math, and many of them start off with a deceptively simple premise, like: What's the biggest couch you can slide...
  • Jun 21, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Johnny Ball discusses Archimedes and the volume of a sphere.
  • Jun 19, 2021
    (via NASA Goddard) The Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, spacecraft was launched on Feb. 11, 2010, and began collecting science data a few months later.
  • Jun 18, 2021
    (via Vox) Like any virus, SARS-CoV-2 has been mutating constantly since the beginning of the pandemic. Until November of 2020, though, that didn’t seem to matter.
  • Jun 18, 2021
    Microcosmos demonstrates that eggs are both wondrous and occasionally independent.
  • Jun 17, 2021
    (via Veritasium) If you ran evolution all over again, would you get humans? How repeatable is #evolution?
  • Jun 17, 2021
    (via Vsauce2) Your mind is a massive collection of information, patterns, trivia, algorithms, and more -- and you have absolutely no idea how or when any of it is going to be useful....
  • Jun 17, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) How many times can I half the distance between my hands? Assume perfect coordination and the ability to localize my palms to the quantum level. 15 halvings gets...
  • Jun 17, 2021
    (via Deep Look) Hermit crabs are *obsessed* with snail shells. These crafty little crabs, found in California's rocky intertidal zone, are more than happy to let the snails build...
  • Jun 16, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) 66 million years ago, maybe on a Tuesday afternoon, life was the same as it had been the day before or a thousand years before or pretty much a million years before....
  • Jun 16, 2021
    (via TEDEd) On sunny days, citizens of ancient Rome could be found exchanging news and gossip while attending to more urgent business at the public latrines. Today, most cultures...
  • Jun 16, 2021
    (via SciShow) Mountains take can take billions of years to form, but the Adirondack Mountains got ahead by recycling itself.
  • Jun 16, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) We could quite possibly catch solar winds as a means for endless energy, and though it sounds like science fiction, we have the materials to do this now.
  • Jun 15, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Forests don’t usually come to mind as a habitat for sharks. But marine forests provide a home for 35% of the world’s sharks. Mangrove forests in particular...
  • Jun 15, 2021
    (via Reactions) Excited to get back out in the world but worried you’ve forgotten how to talk to other humans? We have some chemistry trivia to help ease you back in.
  • Jun 10, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) It turns out that defining what is and isn't a “tree” is way harder than it seems.
  • Jun 10, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) While recent news about the Chinese Long March 5 Rocket made a lot of people very nervous because a 22-ton rocket was going to fall out of the sky, this sort of...
  • Jun 9, 2021
    (via Physics Girl) Why are there holes all over the southern California desert? This area is a unique basin that should actually be 20,000 ft below sea level. So I traveled there and...
  • Jun 9, 2021
    Backyard Scientist shows what a powerful capacitor will do to various objects.
  • Jun 5, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) It might surprise you but cephalopods have a pretty good fossil record, with one major exception. If squids were swimming around in the same oceans as their closest...
  • Jun 4, 2021
    (via AsapSCIENCE) Viral videos show people with "magnetic arms" after a vaccine, so what is GOING ON!?
  • Jun 4, 2021
    (via SciShow) Some chefs swear by copper pots and pans, but they are much more expensive than other materials. Are they worth it? Well, it all comes down to electrons!
  • Jun 4, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) We might have a strong hand because having a weak hand is actually useful.
  • Jun 3, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Here’s a thought: What IS a thought? I know it involves my brain, and my brain is made of neurons.
  • Jun 2, 2021
    (via Periodic Videos) Today we do some demonstrations with Ammonium Chloride.
  • Jun 2, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Before we could set foot on the moon, the Surveyor missions were sent to give future astronauts some sure footing.
  • Jun 2, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) America is a land of constant progress. Sometimes it seems like there’s nothing we can’t accomplish. And then we try to build something...
  • Jun 1, 2021
    (via Microcosmos) Not all hypotheses need to be good. In fact, many of them are terrible. It’s just that when you’re trying to understand the world, you might find...
  • May 31, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Everyone will say this craft breaks the laws of physics.
  • May 31, 2021
    (via SciShow) Explaining strange Earth geology is often straightforward — combine a volcanic eruption a dash of erosion, and boom, you’ve got a striking cliff! But not...
  • May 28, 2021
    (via TEDEd) On Olympus, you’ve been waiting for an opportunity to bring the bloody Trojan War to its conclusion. The two sides have agreed to a brief truce, and when you...
  • May 28, 2021
    (via SciShow) Don't be fooled! The yellow or white corn you see in the grocery store is only the tip of the rainbow-colored iceberg of corn coloration. And these more genetically...
  • May 27, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) The global pandemic led to a drop in outdoor air pollution, but it also led to an increase in indoor air pollution - and our exposure to it.
  • May 27, 2021
    (via ACS Reactions) If you have diabetes, you have way too much sugar in your bloodstream. So does eating a lot of sugar cause it?
  • May 26, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) It’s fair to say that black holes may be the scariest objects in the universe. Happily for us, the nearest is probably many light-years away. Unless of...
  • May 24, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) For millions of years, Christmas Island has been a tiny crab utopia. However, in recent years an invader has begun attacking and killing the local inhabitants.
  • May 24, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Not everything that is true can be proven. This discovery transformed infinity, changed the course of a world war and led to the modern computer.
  • May 24, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Weasels have an extreme body plan that may push the boundaries of what’s metabolically possible. So when and how did this happen? Why'd the weasels get so skinny?
  • May 21, 2021
    (via TED) You know the old rule that you need to drink eight glasses of water every day? It's simply a myth, says Dr. Jen Gunter. In this episode, she explains the amazing way your...
  • May 21, 2021
    (via SciShow) We’ve all been tripped up by tongue-twisters. That’s the whole point! But at a neuroscientific level, they’re as difficult to understand as they are...
  • May 20, 2021
    (via Healthcare Triage) Though likely to face many legal challenges, the FDA recently issued a ban on menthol flavoring in traditional cigarettes and cigars. So why the specific ban...
  • May 20, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Quantum mechanics forbids us from measuring the universe beyond a certain level of precision. But that doesn’t stop us from trying. And in some cases...
  • May 20, 2021
    (via Minute Physics) This video is about using Bohmian trajectories to visualize the wavefunctions of hydrogen orbitals, rendered in 3D using custom python code in Blender.
  • May 19, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Discover the phenomenon known as asymmetrical sleep, where parts of an animal's brain are asleep while other areas remain active.
  • May 19, 2021
    (via SciShow) Damascus steel blades were not only visually stunning with their intricate, swirling patterns, but they were also known for being incredibly sharp. Unfortunately, the...
  • May 19, 2021
    (via Deep Look) The devilish caterpillars of the pipevine swallowtail butterfly *devour* the California pipevine, never mind that the plant is trying to poison them. Their butterfly...
  • May 17, 2021
    (via NASA Goddard) OSIRIS-REx has imaged Bennu in higher resolution than we have Earth and our own Moon. Since its arrival at the asteroid on Dec. 3, 2018, the spacecraft has...
  • May 14, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Because there are so many different types of penises among our evolutionary relatives, we didn’t know until a recent discovery whether they all had the same...
  • May 14, 2021
    (via SciShow) Given just a little time, bacteria could outgrow earth, so what's stopping them?
  • May 13, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) 420 million years ago, the forest floor of what's now New York was covered with a plant that didn’t look like a tree at all, except its roots were made of wood....
  • May 12, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Is there a border we will never cross? Are there places we will never reach, no matter how hard we try? It turns out, there are. Even with sci-fi technology, we are...
  • May 12, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) What if we could grow buildings on other worlds? Researchers are looking to fungi to help us colonize the stars.
  • May 12, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) There’s one rule on Space Time: It’s never Aliens. But every rule has an exception and this rule is no exception because: It’s never aliens,...
  • May 11, 2021
    (via Veritasium) If there's a hotel with infinite rooms, could it ever be completely full? Could you run out of space to put everyone? The surprising answer is yes -- this is...
  • May 11, 2021
    (via SciShow) For more than a hundred years, we've been studying fossils of Tyrannosaurus rex. But despite all the new insights we've gained, many of the popular images of T. rex...
  • May 11, 2021
    (via Physics Girl) A mud puddle started moving across the California desert, and no one knows why. Dianna visited the mud spring to find out how a puddle became declared a natural...
  • May 10, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) These ants are forced to evacuate after realising their nest is built on a drainage area. However, they have an ingenious way to survive.
  • May 10, 2021
    (via SciShow) Regular old glass like the kind that makes up a mason jar can shatter and explode if put in the oven. But we do have types of glass that you can bake your pie or...
  • May 7, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) A lone praying mantis picks off a few ants before the colony calls for backup.
  • May 5, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Humans are the only animals known to faint due to triggers like shock, fear, or pain; this is due to a combination of our massive brains and upright stance.
  • May 5, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) A human with the metabolism of a hummingbird would need to eat about 80,000 calories a day to survive. That’s because staying warm by making your...
  • May 5, 2021
    (via Deep Look) Look past their grasping claws and lightning-fast stingers, and you'll see scorpions have a delicate pair of comb-like organs on their belly called pectines. These...
  • May 4, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) All over the world, giant wave breaks appear because of underwater geology that supercharges their wave energy.
  • May 1, 2021
    (via Smarter Every Day) Weed Eater Wars: 8 Types of Weedeater Line square off in a single elimination battle.
  • Apr 30, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Your eyes get heavy and gradually close… But wait! It’s only lunch time and you still have so much to do. Would taking a nap help? Or would it derail your...
  • Apr 30, 2021
    (via SciShow) Fish in a tree? How can that be? For some aquatic creatures, it's not necessarily bad to be a fish out of water.
  • Apr 30, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) While dinosaurs were dominating the land, the metriorhynchids were thriving in the seas. But taking that plunge wasn’t easy because it takes a very special set...
  • Apr 29, 2021
    (via SciShow) For many, COVID has been a devastating virus, but there are people who don't exhibit any symptoms at all. Why is that?
  • Apr 29, 2021
    (via Vox) A program called Covax wants to distribute Covid-19 vaccines fairly. Is it working?
  • Apr 29, 2021
    Jade from Up and Atom explains how life on Earth found a way despite a weaker Sun early on.
  • Apr 28, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Black holes are the most powerful and extreme things in the universe and they are wildly weird and complicated. What would happen if you fell inside one and what are...
  • Apr 26, 2021
    (via NASA-JPL) NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter takes off and lands in this video captured on April 25, 2021, by Mastcam-Z, an imager aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars...
  • Apr 23, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Most of us can probably think of a time when we were enjoying a video game and then suddenly...it's 2 am. And that may not be entirely your fault! Video games are...
  • Apr 22, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) That Einstein guy was a real bummer for our hopes of a star-hopping, science-fiction-y future. His whole “nothing travels faster than light” rule...
  • Apr 22, 2021
    (via Deep Look) Could this tiny creature, named after a mythical multiheaded monster, hold the secret to eternal youth? Related to jellyfish and anemones, the hydra has an almost...
  • Apr 22, 2021
    (via Kite & Key) How did a Vermont janitor retire with $8 million to his name? How did Warren Buffett make 96% of his fortune after the age of 65? It turns out that both of those...
  • Apr 21, 2021
    (via TEDEd) In 2004, construction began on a new building in Dubai, promising a revolutionary design that would dwarf the rest of the world’s skyscrapers. Five years later, the...
  • Apr 21, 2021
    (via SciShow) Have you ever wondered why 75% humidity in the summer feels sticky, but 75% humidity in the winter feels super dry? Turns out, the common definition of humidity is...
  • Apr 21, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) The name “The Big Bang” makes it sound like there was a big explosion in one particular spot, but if that’s the case, where did it happen?
  • Apr 21, 2021
    (via Reactions) Catalytic converter theft is on the rise, and that’s partly because of their chemistry.
  • Apr 20, 2021
    (via TEDEd) One of these three creatures is thought to possess the world’s most painful insect sting: there’s an ant that forages in rainforest canopies, a bee that...
  • Apr 20, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Ocean currents are our planet’s circulatory system, and they keep everything from ecosystems to the climate healthy. But we’re changing Earth...
  • Apr 20, 2021
    (via NASA JPL) In this video captured by NASA’s Perseverance rover, the agency's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter took the first powered, controlled flight on another planet on April...
  • Apr 20, 2021
    Journey to the Microcosmos shows off microbes' fascinating feet.
  • Apr 19, 2021
    (via Smarter Every Day) This amazing display showing a live chicken embryo was at the Exploratorium in San Francisco.
  • Apr 17, 2021
    (via Veritasium) This robot has applications to archaeology, space exploration, and search and rescue — with a simple elegant design inspired by a plant.
  • Apr 17, 2021
    (via Healthcare Triage) Dark chocolate has gained a health food reputation, but is the hype too good to be true? Is it possible that a daily dose of something so delicious can...
  • Apr 16, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Why aren’t commercial flights getting faster? Dig into the technological and environmental problems facing supersonic flight.
  • Apr 16, 2021
    (via SciShow) Venomous snakes produce some of the world’s deadliest substances, so they have to be pretty careful about how they use it. But what happens if they accidentally...
  • Apr 16, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) There are a lot of incredible things in space, but neutron stars are some of the most mind-blowing. From liquid plasma oceans on the surface to a possible neutron...
  • Apr 15, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) It may be that for every star in the universe there are billions of microscopic black holes streaming through the solar system, the planet, even our bodies every...
  • Apr 14, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Do we need nuclear energy to stop climate change? More and more voices from science, environmental activists and the press have been saying so in recent years...
  • Apr 14, 2021
    (via TEDEd) In 1963, scientists studying Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest made a shocking discovery. Their most recent rainfall samples were nearly 100 times more acidic than usual;...
  • Apr 14, 2021
    (via Numberphile) OEIS founder Neil Sloane with more sequences to ponder - of course!
  • Apr 13, 2021
    (via SciShow) When you hear the words dire wolf, your mind might jump to Game of Thrones or Dungeons and Dragons, but dire wolves are not just in the realm of fantasy and fiction....
  • Apr 12, 2021
  • Apr 10, 2021
    (via SciShow) Today, bones hold us up. But for ancient jawless fishes, bones may have been a way to store energy for long journeys. Plus, new research indicated that hippos and...
  • Apr 10, 2021
    (via Sixty Symbols) Professor Tony Padilla on life on a "donut planet" - leading to discussion about how the Earth and Moon formed.
  • Apr 8, 2021
    (via SciShow) Forget lab rats — meet the Chinese or striped-back hamster, an unassuming little rodent whose role in research over the years has led to breakthroughs in...
  • Apr 8, 2021
    (via Seeker) As green technologies become more common, scientists are trying to 'green' the lithium-ion batteries that power them. One question being: can we innovate ways to reuse...
  • Apr 8, 2021
    (via Reactions) Forever chemicals are used in everything from rain jackets to jet fuel. But the chemistry behind what makes them useful also makes them stick around in the...
  • Apr 8, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Today, chilis are the most widely cultivated spice crop in the world - grown everywhere from their native home in the Americas to Europe, Africa, and Asia. But how and...
  • Apr 7, 2021
    (via SciShow) Why do cats love catnip so much? Researchers have found a possible evolutionary answer to this adorable feline phenomenon!
  • Apr 7, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) There’s one kind of planet we’ve found more often than any other in the universe so far: mini-Neptunes. Now, some scientists think they’ve...
  • Apr 7, 2021
    (via Deep Look) This fly’s larvae tunnel inside bitter-tasting greens like arugula and kale, leaving squiggly marks behind. The plants fight back with toxic chemicals. So...
  • Apr 7, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) You’ve probably heard about the supervolcano in Yellowstone. But did you know it’s one of three supervolcanoes in the United States? Can we prevent...
  • Apr 6, 2021
    (via TEDEd) It’s 1997. The United States Senate has called a hearing about global warming. Some expert witnesses point out that past periods in Earth’s history were...
  • Apr 6, 2021
     Journey to the Microcosmos describes how diatoms get their wondrous cells.
  • Apr 5, 2021
    CGP Grey uses a piece of metric paper to provide us a sense of scale of the Universe.
  • Apr 5, 2021
    (via SciShow) You might have wondered why bumblebees stop for a moment to stare at the flower they were just interacted with. Are they cherishing all the good times they had...
  • Apr 3, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) The FDA approved the first COVID vaccine for use in the United States only nine months to the day that the World Health Organization declared the disease a global...
  • Apr 3, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) The body can get a whole lot colder - but not a whole lot hotter - before we die. Why is that?
  • Apr 2, 2021
    (via SciShow) Fairies do exist! Well, sort of...meet the fairyfly, the smallest insect on Earth that specializes in the magic of miniaturization!
  • Apr 2, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Humans are fascinated by shiny stuff. Not only do we find these things attractive, but we also tend to perceive them as being high quality. Well, turns out this...
  • Apr 1, 2021
    (via Veritasium) How does order spontaneously arise out of chaos?
  • Apr 1, 2021
    Destin from Smarter Every Day is bamboozled by earthworms that are attracted to magnets.
  • Apr 1, 2021
    (via AsapSCIENCE) Penis size, taint size and sperm count are decreasing in men. This is the science of why!
  • Apr 1, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Neil Sloane from the OEIS has another number sequence which escalates quickly.
  • Mar 31, 2021
    (via SciShow) The ground under our feet is constantly moving, and to measure these movements, researchers have turned to an unlikely helper: quasars that are millions of light-years...
  • Mar 31, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) The Astrophysics Pioneers program is funding four innovative new missions that read like a best-hits album of the most exciting astronomical frontiers: from...
  • Mar 30, 2021
    (via SciShow) Improving batteries is a tough problem, but it’s also an important one because in many ways the future of our planet also depends on the future of batteries....
  • Mar 30, 2021
    (via Boston Dynamics) Meet Stretch, a prototype of our new robot designed to automate box moving tasks in warehouses and distribution centers. Stretch’s mobile base allows it...
  • Mar 27, 2021
    (via Veritasium) This video is about stuff: light bulbs, printers, phones and why they aren't better.
  • Mar 26, 2021
    Chernobyl, Fukushima, The Simpsons power plant, they all involve lies!
  • Mar 26, 2021
    (via SciShow) Vaccines teach your immune system to recognize pathogens, but sometimes your body needs a bit of a reminder.
  • Mar 26, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) In Parkinson's disease, certain kinds of neurons die over time, but it might be possible to reprogram other types of cells in the brain to replace those lost ones.
  • Mar 26, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) No other placental mammal that we know of prefers one side of the body so consistently, not even our closest primate relatives. But being right-handed may have deep...
  • Mar 25, 2021
    (via Deep Look) To find its place in the shade! Each hollowed-out seed is home to a head-banging moth larva, just trying to survive the harsh Sonoran Desert sun.
  • Mar 25, 2021
    A microscope expert shows off his blood.
  • Mar 24, 2021
    (via SciShow) Scientists think they’ve discovered some peaks taller than Mt Everest deep beneath the earth’s crust, and this range might be the key to one of the biggest...
  • Mar 24, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) From what we know about Titan, it seems like its atmosphere should have disappeared millions of years ago. So, why hasn’t it?
  • Mar 24, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) “A moving arrow is at rest.” This is obviously a nonsensical contradiction. But Zeno, a Greek philosopher famous for his metaphysical trolling,...
  • Mar 24, 2021
    (via Vox) In the US, the first two available Covid-19 vaccines were the ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. Both vaccines have very high "efficacy rates," of around 95%. But the...
  • Mar 23, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Historically, most cars have run on gasoline, but that doesn’t have to be the case in the future: other liquid fuels and electricity can also power cars. So what...
  • Mar 23, 2021
    (via SciShow) You might not think of a sea creature as helpful in the prevention of climate change, but sperm whales have been doing their part to cool the planet by doing what most...
  • Mar 23, 2021
    Backyard Scientist shows what happens when you pour molten aluminum from fifty feet high.
  • Mar 22, 2021
    (via Minute Physics) This video is about the "Kelvin wake" shape of water wakes behind boats - we talk about mach angle, dispersion, superposition of many waves, and how these all...
  • Mar 19, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) The cell nucleus is crucial to multicellular life, so you think science would have a good idea how it evolved. The truth is, we don't, but Scientists do have some...
  • Mar 19, 2021
    (via SpaceX) On March 3, Starship serial number 10 (SN10) completed SpaceX’s third high-altitude flight test of a Starship prototype as it successfully ascended, transitioned...
  • Mar 19, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Have you ever wondered why you feel better after a good, hearty sob? Well, it turns out the reasons are kind of a mystery, and they range from social support to...
  • Mar 19, 2021
    (via Vsauce2) Please don’t use a toaster in the bathtub. The combination of electricity and water will be too much for your heart. But why don’t fish have the same...
  • Mar 18, 2021
    (via SciShow) Our bones are multi-functional body builders, but perhaps their most mysterious function is the production of blood. Scientists now think they have a pretty good idea...
  • Mar 18, 2021
    (viaa It's Okay to Be Smart) Could humans ever evolve to have wings? Why don’t fish have propellers? Why don’t tigers have wheels? Why don’t zebras have laser...
  • Mar 18, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Earth isn't the only planet that gets rocked by giant tsunamis. In fact, giant waves on other planets have helped us solve a few mysteries about our solar system.
  • Mar 17, 2021
    (via TEDEd) No matter how we make electricity, it takes up space. Coal requires mines, and plants to convert it into electricity. Nuclear power takes uranium mines, facilities to...
  • Mar 17, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) I have good news and bad news. Bad news first: two years ago we reported on the Crisis in Cosmology. Since then, it’s only gotten worse. And actually, the...
  • Mar 17, 2021
    (via Vox) The world's tallest mountain just got a little taller — here's why.
  • Mar 17, 2021
    (via Veritasium) For thousands of years, mathematicians were calculating Pi the obvious but numerically inefficient way. Then Newton came along  and changed the game.
  • Mar 16, 2021
    (via TEDEd) As a breeze blows through the savannah, a snake-shaped tube stretches into the air and scans the horizon like a periscope. But it’s not seeing— it’s...
  • Mar 16, 2021
    (via SciShow) With their squishy bodies and color-changing abilities, octopuses and other cephalopods already look like our planet’s resident aliens. But researchers have...
  • Mar 15, 2021
    (via Periodic Videos) Senior technician Neil Barnes re-enacts a favourite experiment from his childhood, reacting aluminium and sodium hydroxide to produce hydrogen.
  • Mar 12, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) The golden ratio. Some say it’s the most mythical number in the universe. Others say it underlies everything from nature’s patterns to beauty...
  • Mar 12, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) There’s no doubt that lithium has a diverse list of uses. But the way that it interacts with our bodies to help treat bipolar disorder is aiding us in...
  • Mar 12, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) In order to truly understand differences among animal lifespans, we need to stop thinking about a specific number and start thinking about a distribution.
  • Mar 11, 2021
    (via PBS Deep Look) Female aphids are the matriarchs of a successful family operation— taking over your garden. But don’t lose hope; these pests have some serious...
  • Mar 11, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) We know that gravity exerts its pull on light, and we have an explanation for why. Actually, we have multiple explanations that all predict the same thing. And...
  • Mar 11, 2021
    (via SciShow) It seems like a simple question with a straightforward answer, but when you look at the total environmental impact of each type of bag, things start to get a little...
  • Mar 11, 2021
    (via Numberphile) Kit Yates explains how he calculated that all the SARS-CoV-2 in the world would fit inside a Coke can - and discusses "Fermi Estimates".
  • Mar 10, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) At first glance, a cashless society sounds appealing: no hassle, quick purchase, and freedom from dirty pieces of paper. But what are the downsides?
  • Mar 10, 2021
    (via Kite and Key) Everything that powers our modern lifestyle—electric cars, smartphones, even wind turbines—requires minerals extracted from the earth. Minerals are...
  • Mar 10, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Let us explore the scientific mystery of what would happen to you, if Earth suddenly turned into gold! The “Midaspocalypse”, based on the ancient tale of...
  • Mar 10, 2021
    (via SciShow) One might not think that snow could help anything stay warm through a harsh winter, but these tiny bats have found a way to utilize the insulation provided by the snow:...
  • Mar 9, 2021
    Jade from Up and Atom explains a paradox about infinity.
  • Mar 9, 2021
    (via SciShow) Seasonal illnesses from infectious diseases aren’t a new concept, but a few decades ago public health experts began to notice the same behavior in some...
  • Mar 8, 2021
    (via SciShow) We often think of the ocean as a pretty serene, lovely place to relax. But it turns out there's quite a racket going on under the waves, and some of the culprits are...
  • Mar 5, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Fast food was invented to help us keep up with our fast-paced world. But it’s also had some unintended psychological consequences and can influence our...
  • Mar 4, 2021
    SpaceX's SN10 Starship stuck its landing today after launching to a height of ten kilometers. It subsequently exploded.
  • Mar 3, 2021
    (via Minute Physics) This video is about how physics dictates the design of modern windmills - why they are so big, have so few blades, and have such skinny blades.
  • Mar 3, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Most of the universe is made up of dark matter, so could it form into stars and galaxies like regular matter?
  • Mar 2, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Today roads, sidewalks, bridges, and skyscrapers are made of a material called concrete. There’s three tons of it for every person on Earth. It’s also played...
  • Feb 26, 2021
    (via SciShow) You might think that you’re pretty familiar with your body, but it turns out that our bodies still have some surprises for us!
  • Feb 25, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) We know that gravity must cause clocks to run slow on the basis of logical consistency. And we know that gravity DOES cause clocks to run slow based on many...
  • Feb 25, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Our DNA holds thousands of dead genes and we’ve only just begun to unravel their stories. But one thing is already clear: we’re not just defined by the...
  • Feb 24, 2021
    (via SciShow) If you’re lucky enough to witness a panda applying a ripe layer of horse poop body paint to itself, you might assume it is a similar behavior to a dog frolicking...
  • Feb 24, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) In space we can finally get away from pesky flies landing in our drinks! But before we can live off-Earth full time, sending flies into orbit is helping us study...
  • Feb 23, 2021
    (via NASA) NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance mission captured thrilling footage of its rover landing in Mars' Jezero Crater on Feb. 18, 2021. The real footage in this video was captured...
  • Feb 23, 2021
    (via Microcosmos) As the search for alternative energy sources continues, scientists are looking to the microcosmos and wondering: Can we use algae oil to power our cars, our...
  • Feb 22, 2021
    Destin from Smarter Every day digs in to how nuclear submarines make oxygen for their crews.
  • Feb 19, 2021
    (via Minute Physics) This video covers the General theory of Relativity, developed by Albert Einstein, from basic simple levels (it's gravity, curved space) through to the concepts...
  • Feb 19, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Robots of the future may be softer, squishier and bendier than robots today. This could make them ideal for space exploration.
  • Feb 19, 2021
    (via SciShow) For upside-down mirrors, super hot volcanic chimneys, and neon rocks with living microorganisms, look no further than the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California.
  • Feb 19, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Different dogs look incredibly different - but that doesn't mean they are necessarily more diverse.
  • Feb 18, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) It was pretty impressive when LIGO detected gravitational waves from colliding black holes. Well we’ve just taken that to the next level with a...
  • Feb 18, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) The biggest turtle ever described wasn’t an ancestor of today’s leatherback turtles or any other living sea turtles. But it looks like there are some...
  • Feb 17, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Since 1850, global average temperatures have risen by 1 degree Celsius. That may not sound like a lot, but it is. Why? 1 degree is an average. Many places have already...
  • Feb 16, 2021
    (via Mark Rober) This will be cooler than the Super Bowl. Thanks to Bill and Melinda Gates for partnering with me on this video.
  • Feb 16, 2021
    (via SciShow) Seymour might have had better luck had he raised one of these Bornean plants instead of a giant Venus flytrap. Instead of evolving to eat animals, they’ve evolved...
  • Feb 16, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) When is now? Seems like a pretty simple question… just look at your watch. But do you and I share the same “now”? Let’s journey...
  • Feb 15, 2021
    (via Mental Floss) Evolution is a complex process. Natural selection, "survival of the fittest," that one image where the monkeys slowly turn into a human... what does it all mean??...
  • Feb 13, 2021
    (via SciShow) Near the end of 2020, we got some puzzling but good news: COVID-19 fatality rates have been dropping. Here are a few factors that might help explain why we’re...
  • Feb 13, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Certain cognitive biases cause humans to make unsafe decisions in a pandemic, making a terrible disease even worse.
  • Feb 13, 2021
    (via NASA JPL) All landings on Mars are difficult, but NASA's Perseverance rover is attempting to touch down in the most challenging terrain on Mars ever targeted.
  • Feb 13, 2021
    (via Vox) Big, expensive highway expansion projects are the source of a lot US transportation funding — but they aren't a silver bullet for congestion relief. In communities...
  • Feb 12, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) The evolution of our ability to speak is its own epic saga and it’s worth pausing to appreciate that. It’s taken several million years to get to this...
  • Feb 11, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) There’s a deep connection between gravity and time - gravitational fields seem to slow the pace of time in what we call gravitational time dilation. And...
  • Feb 10, 2021
    (via SciShow) Why can amphibians, fish and even some reptiles regenerate limbs, while birds and mammals can’t? Researchers think they might have found a clue on the tip of the...
  • Feb 10, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Most galaxies that we know of are spirals, including the Milky Way, but how do they form and keep their shape over billions of years?
  • Feb 10, 2021
    Jade from Up and Atom delves into the Dark Sky paradox.
  • Feb 9, 2021
    (via SciShow) You would think that almost everyone has the same exact number of bones in their body, but that number is different, and changing, in everyone!
  • Feb 8, 2021
    (via Mark Rober) My Field Goal Kicking Robot v. the NFL longest field goal record holder Matt Prater.
  • Feb 5, 2021
    (via Veritasium) I got the chance to interview Bill Gates so I asked him: Will Covid-19 be the last pandemic? How does he deal with misinformation and conspiracy theories? And what...
  • Feb 5, 2021
    (via TEDEd) It may not appear very lively six feet underground, but a single teaspoon of soil contains more organisms than there are human beings on the planet. From bacteria and...
  • Feb 5, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Since the start of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, the term “herd immunity” has been all over the news. But what does it really mean? One...
  • Feb 4, 2021
    (via SciShow) So, moose licking cars in winter is a thing, if you live in a place that has both moose and winter. But why on earth do they do this?!
  • Feb 3, 2021
    (via Kurzgesagt) Nuclear energy creates an uneasy feeling of danger for many people: ancient and dangerous minerals are concentrated to awaken seemingly unnatural powers, creating...
  • Feb 3, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) In the 1800s, William Parsons built a telescope larger than any in the world: The Leviathan of Parsonstown. This landmark in science history helped solve the...
  • Feb 3, 2021
    (via TEDEd) Explore what would happen if all of humanity’s satellites disappeared and the real-life scenarios that could lead to such a catastrophe.
  • Feb 2, 2021
    (via Minute Earth) Under the right conditions, wildfires can form clouds and generate firestorms, which last far longer than normal thunderstorms.
  • Feb 2, 2021
    Pelomyxa are giant amoeba capable of growing as much as five millimeters in length.
  • Feb 2, 2021
    (via Boston Dynamics) Now that Spot has an arm in addition to legs and cameras, it can do mobile manipulation. It finds and picks up objects (trash), tidies up the living room, opens...
  • Feb 1, 2021
    Tim Harford explains a few annoying puzzles.
  • Feb 1, 2021
    Destin from Smarter Every Day explains the complicated steps to landing on the Moon.
  • Feb 1, 2021
    Hank Green describes five incredible miniature robots.
  • Feb 1, 2021
    (via Healthcare Triage) Reports have surfaced of individuals being re-infected with Covid-19, raising questions about immunity via natural infection as well as questions about the...
  • Jan 29, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) By the time you've read this, a billion billion dark matter particles may have streamed through your body like ghosts. The particle or particles of the dark...
  • Jan 29, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) Our DNA holds evidence of a huge, ancient pandemic, one that touched many different species, spanned the globe, and lasted for more than 15 million years.
  • Jan 28, 2021
    (via Veritasium) What are these electric blue ponds in the middle of the Utah desert? And why do they keep changing color?
  • Jan 28, 2021
    (via Vox) In the 1780s, a charismatic healer caused a stir in Paris.
  • Jan 27, 2021
    (via Deep Look) Two tiny mites duke it out on strawberry plants throughout California. One is a spider mite that sucks the juices out of the delicious crop and destroys it. The...
  • Jan 26, 2021
    (via Big Think) The universe is expanding faster and faster. Whether this acceleration will end in a Big Rip or will reverse and contract into a Big Crunch is not yet understood, and...
  • Jan 26, 2021
    (via SciShow) Geologists have a few ideas as to how rain affects mountains. But could rain also help mountains grow?
  • Jan 25, 2021
    (via SciShow) You may be aware of certain hacks to sober up, but researchers have found a way to actually get booze out of our systems faster. And this discovery could help first...
  • Jan 22, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) This ancient species had the same six legs and segmented body that we’d recognize from an ant today. But it also had a huge, scythe-like jaw and a horn coming...
  • Jan 22, 2021
    (via SciShow) We humans can rely on our internal body heat to help keep us warm. But what can cold-blooded animals do when faced with the threat of freezing? Here are three creatures...
  • Jan 21, 2021
    (via BBC Earth) This little pygmy gecko has an amazing superpower, that helps it survive in the wet season.
  • Jan 20, 2021
    (via SciShow) You probably don't consider algae to be super aggressive, but 66 million years ago had to turn to murder in order to survive.
  • Jan 20, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) We can learn a lot about our galaxy by looking to the stars, but we can also reveal a lot about our cosmic history from... Dead trees?
  • Jan 20, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Today we’re going to delve into a couple of the most famous paradoxes of special relativity: the Twin Paradox, The Ladder Paradox (aka the Barn-Pole...
  • Jan 19, 2021
    Eric Lander discusses how quasiperfect numbers gave him a start...
  • Jan 19, 2021
    We’ve scoured the data for you when it comes to Vitamin D supplements, coming up empty-handed almost every time. We know it doesn’t help with a variety of conditions,...
  • Jan 15, 2021
    (via minutephysics) This video is about how cheap, fast, and LESS sensitive rapid antigen tests might be better for screening (& maybe surveillance) than PCR COVID tests due to...
  • Jan 15, 2021
    (via SciShow) Octopuses and other cephalopods can squirt ink when threatened, but the forms the ink takes can go way beyond your typical smokescreen.
  • Jan 14, 2021
    A bioluminescent microbe saved astronaut Jim Lovell. Meet the dinoflagellate.
  • Jan 14, 2021
    (via PBS Eons) It’s important to us that you understand how big this beaver was. Just like modern beavers, it was semiaquatic -- it lived both on the land and in the water. The...
  • Jan 14, 2021
    (via Deep Look) California oak moth caterpillars eat all the leaves on an oak, leaving a brown skeleton. Then they rappel down on a strand of silk, twirling and swinging. If you were...
  • Jan 13, 2021
    (via SciShow) Plants need light to survive. But apparently, that doesn't have to be sunlight.
  • Jan 13, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Humans have been using microbes to separate minerals from mud since the middle of the last century, so we know biomining works on earth. But how will these tiny...
  • Jan 13, 2021
    (via PBS Space Time) Since the very beginning of quantum mechanics, a debate has raged about how to interpret its bizarre predictions. And at the heart and origin of that debate is...
  • Jan 12, 2021
    (via NASA Goddard) One of the Hubble Space Telescope’s most iconic images is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, which unveiled myriad galaxies across the universe, stretching back to...
  • Jan 12, 2021
    (via It's Okay to Be Smart) Everyone lies. Even you and even me. We lie about small things and we lie about big things. We lie to help ourselves and we lie to protect others....
  • Jan 9, 2021
    (via SciShow Space) Exoplanets have taught us a lot more about planets than our solar system could ever teach us, from what happens when they’re born, to what happens when...
  • Jan 8, 2021
    (via SciShow) You might think the white patches that grow on whale’s heads and faces are just weird skin growths, and you’re not wrong. But when you look closer, these...
  • Jan 8, 2021
    (via SciShow Psych) Sometimes you hear music and you automatically tap your foot, or do a little dance, or walk to the beat. What’s happening in your brain that makes your body...
  • Jan 6, 2021
    (via SciShow) Can you actually drink that steaming mug of snake venom? The science comes down to the difference between poisons and venoms, and to the oral toxicity of the venom...
  • Jan 5, 2021
    (via Quanta) The Riemann hypothesis is the most notorious unsolved problem in all of mathematics. Ever since it was first proposed by Bernhard Riemann in 1859, the conjecture has...
  • Jan 5, 2021
    (via Microcosmos) Bacterial flagella are very hard to spot in our footage, but we see evidence of them in almost every single one of our videos. The question is, how do they work,...
  • Jan 4, 2021
    (via SciShow) From medieval knights to face shields, humans are pretty big fans of armor. But it turns out that other organisms use armor, too! Except sometimes, their armor...
  • Jan 1, 2021
    (via Seeker) When you think of the Plague, the Black Death of the 14th century, with its medieval cities overrun with rats and creepy plague masks, probably comes to mind. But the...
  • Jan 1, 2021
    (via Veritasium) Ames window illusion illustrates how we don't directly perceive external reality.