May 21, 2013

Why We're Heading for Another Mass Extinction

Annalee Newitz, io9


AP Photo

A mass extinction happens when over 75 percent of all species on the planet die in a period of less than two million years. That may sound long to you, but it's the blink of an eye in geologic time. There have been five mass extinctions on Earth over the past 540 million years, sometimes caused by catastrophic disasters, and sometimes by quiet, insidious events like invasive species taking over the planet.

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TAGGED: Mass Extinction, Invasive Species, Supervolcanoes, Climate Change

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