April 17, 2013

Lionfish Attacking Atlantic Like Living Oil Spill

Elizabeth Shogren, NPR


AP Photo

A gluttonous predator is power-eating its way through reefs from New York to Venezuela. It's the lionfish.

And although researchers are coming up with new ways to protect some reefs from the flamboyant maroon-striped fish, they have no hope of stopping its unparalleled invasion.

Lad Akins has scuba dived in the vibrant reefs of the Bahamas for many years. But when he returned a couple years ago, he saw almost no fish larger than his hand.

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TAGGED: Invasive Species, Oceans, Ecosystems, Coral Reef, Fish

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