March 29, 2013

Antibiotic Resistance: From Livestock to Humans

M. McKenna, Wired


AP Photo

The antibiotic era was barely 20 years old when people started raising concerns about using the new “miracle drugs” in agriculture. Penicillin first entered use in 1943, streptomycin in 1944, tetracycline in 1948 — and by 1965, the United Kingdom’s Agricultural Research Council was hearing testimony that organisms common in food animals, especially Salmonella, were becoming resistant to the antibiotics being used on the animals while they were alive.

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TAGGED: MRSA, Staphylococcus Aureus, Bacteria, Livestock, Antibiotic Resistance, Antibiotics

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