February 26, 2013

Sleeping Less than 6 Hours Skews Gene Activity

Ian Sample, Guardian


AP Photo

Getting too little sleep for several nights in a row disrupts hundreds of genes that are essential for good health, including those linked to stress and fighting disease.

Tests on people who slept less than six hours a night for a week revealed substantial changes in the activity of genes that govern the immune system, metabolism, sleep and wake cycles, and the body's response to stress, suggesting that poor sleep could have a broad impact on long-term wellbeing.

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TAGGED: Gene Expression, Sleep Deprivation, Sleep

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