January 14, 2013

Why Bark Beetles Chew Through U.S. Forests

Michael Lemonick, Climate Central


AP Photo

The conifer forests of the North American west have been under a massive assault over the past decade by bark beetles: one species alone, the mountain pine beetle, has killed more than 70,000 square miles’ worth of trees, equivalent to the area of Washington State, and two recent studies have shed some light on how climate change is helping fuel the assault, and what’s likely to happen in a world that continues to warm.

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TAGGED: Climate Change, Trees, Forest, Insects

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