January 11, 2013

China's 1-Child Policy Creates 'Little Emperors'

Stephanie Pappas, LiveScience


AP Photo

Children born under China's one-child policy, which limits most urban families to a single child, are less trusting, more risk-averse and more pessimistic than children born before the policy went into action, a new study finds. 

The research in some ways confirms stereotypes in the Chinese media about "Little Emperor Syndrome," which is the idea that a generation of only children in the country is growing up coddled and unsocialized.

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TAGGED: Population Control, Children, Personality, China

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