December 31, 2012

Does Photographic Memory Truly Exist?

Barry Gordon, Scientific American


AP Photo

The intuitive notion of a “photographic” memory is that it is just like a photograph: you can retrieve it from your memory at will and examine it in detail, zooming in on different parts. But a true photographic memory in this sense has never been proved to exist.

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TAGGED: Neurology, Photographs, Memory

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