December 22, 2012

Why It's Critical to Cover 'Controversial' Science

Ken Fisher, Ars Technica


AP Photo

Ars Technica has never been afraid to cover so-called "controversial" issues in science and culture. Here is why we routinely cover them—and why we reject calls for us to be silent on such issues.

I put "controversial" in quotes for a reason. Many of the topics that are supposedly controversial are not really contentious at all among people who are properly informed and rely on a scientific understanding of the physical world around us.

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: Science Controversy, Science Literacy, Climate Change, Evolution

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

October 19, 2013
Tea Partiers Score High on Science Literacy
Dan Kahan, Cult. Cog. Proj.
The "science comprehension" measure is a composite of 11 items from the National Science Foundation's "Science Indicators" battery, the standard measure of "science literacy" used in public opinion studies (including... more ››
October 21, 2013
Children's Book Perfectly Explains Evolution
Amanda Schaffer, Slate
In some of the best children’s books, dandelions turn into stars, sharks and radishes merge, and pancakes fall from the sky. No one would confuse these magical tales for descriptions of nature. Small children can... more ››
October 21, 2013
Oxygen Does Not Always Lead to Advanced Life
Univ. of S. Denmark
Any textbook will tell you that oxygen is essential for advanced life to evolve. But why did life not explode when oxygen levels rose dramatically 2.1 billion years ago? This is the big question after a Danish/Swedish/French... more ››
October 15, 2013
Mysterious Moose Die-Off Alarms Scientists
Jim Robbins, NY Times
Across North America — in places as far-flung as Montana and British Columbia, New Hampshire and Minnesota — moose populations are in steep decline. And no one is sure why. more ››
October 14, 2013
Is the World Getting Better or Worse?
Bjorn Lomborg, NewScientist
FOR the past half century, a fundamental debate has raged between optimists and pessimists over the state of the world. Pessimists build their case on overpopulation, starvation and depletion of resources. Optimists stand for... more ››