December 21, 2012

Why Average Students Think They're Awesome

Shankar Vedantam, NPR


AP Photo

If you're a student at the halfway point of the academic year, and you've just taken stock of your performance, perhaps you have reason to feel proud of yourself.

But a recent study suggests some of the pride you feel at having done well — especially in science — may be unfounded. Or at least your sense of your performance may not be a very accurate picture of how good you actually are.

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TAGGED: Science Education, Self-esteem, Education

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