December 18, 2012

What We Know About Genetics of Homosexuality

Kate Shaw, Ars Technica


AP Photo

The media was abuzz this week after an international group of researchers proposed that scientists may have been looking for the biological underpinnings of homosexuality in the wrong place. Although scientists have spent the last few decades scouring our genome for a “gay gene,” William Rice, Urban Friberg, and Sergey Gavrilets suggest in The Quarterly Review of Biology that homosexuality may have its roots in epigenetics, rather than in genetics.

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TAGGED: Homosexuality, Genetics, Epigenetics

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