December 12, 2012

The Genius of Ancient Roman Hydraulics

Tom Kington, Guardian


AP Photo

In the middle of a patch of grass amid the ruins of the Caracalla baths in Rome, there is a staircase that takes visitors deep into the ground to a world resembling the lair of a James Bond villain.

"This is our glimpse at maniacal Roman perfection, at incredible hydraulic technology," said archaeologist Marina Piranomonte, as she descended and waved at a network of high and wide tunnels, each measuring six metres (20ft) high and wide, snaking off into the darkness.

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TAGGED: Baths, Hydraulics, Roman Empire, Archaeology

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