December 11, 2012

If We Could Live to 1,000, Should We?

Peter Singer, Project Syndicate


AP Photo

On which problems should we focus research in medicine and the biological sciences? There is a strong argument for tackling the diseases that kill the most people –diseases like malaria, measles, and diarrhea, which kill millions in developing countries, but very few in the developed world.

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TAGGED: Aging, Ethics, Disease, Longevity

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