November 8, 2012

The Beatles' Surprising Contribution to Science

Jon Hamilton, NPR


AP Photo

The same brain system that controls our muscles also helps us remember music, scientists say.

When we listen to a new musical phrase, it is the brain's motor system — not areas involved in hearing — that helps us remember what we've heard, researchers reported at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in New Orleans last month.

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TAGGED: Hearing, Recognition, Memory, Music, Neuroscience

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