August 10, 2012

Why a Bronze Medal Is Better Than Silver

Jason Goldman, SciAm


AP Photo

"So we have the paradox of a man shamed to death because he is only the second pugilist or the second oarsman in the world. That he is able to beat the whole population of the globe minus one is nothing; he has “pitted” himself to beat that one; and as long as he doesn’t do that nothing else counts."

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TAGGED: Psychology, Counterfactual Thinking, Happiness, Olympics

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