April 12, 2012

How Chris Mooney Hijacked Genetics

Hank Campbell, Science 2.0


AP Photo

We know that voting changes your brain a little - just reading that sentence changed your brain a little, so actions and behaviors certainly change us.  But does voting change your descendants?

Epigenetics is really a nascent field and that means there is a lot of interpretation. That also means people can try to make the case that politics is genetic. Which means partisan spinmeisters, within science and outside it, will find new avenues for the confirmation bias of their faithful.

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TAGGED: Epigenetics, Genetics, Science Journalism, Chris Mooney, Liberals, Conservatives, Neuroscience

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