March 14, 2012

Using Children to Make Computers Smarter

Univ. of California-Berkeley, University of California-Berkeley


AP Photo

People often wonder if computers make children smarter. Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, are asking the reverse question: Can children make computers smarter? And the answer appears to be ‘yes.’

UC Berkeley researchers are tapping the cognitive smarts of babies, toddlers and preschoolers to program computers to think more like humans.

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TAGGED: Thinking, Computer Technology, Artificial Intelligence, Children

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