February 15, 2012

Could GM Bacteria Fight Sleeping Sickness?

Michelle Roberts, BBC News


AP Photo

Scientists believe they have found a way to beat sleeping sickness using a bacterium against the tsetse fly host that spreads the disease to humans.

In the same way that we have friendly bacteria in our intestines, the tsetse fly harbours bacteria in its midgut, muscle and salivary glands.

Experts in Belgium have genetically modified these "good bugs" so they attack the culprit parasite carried by the fly.

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TAGGED: Bacteria, Genetically Modified Organisms, Parasites, Sleeping Sickness

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