February 14, 2012

Rapid Evolution Need Not Follow Mass Extinction

Science Daily, Science Daily


AP Photo

In the wake of a mass extinction like the one that occurred 445 million years ago, a common assumption is that surviving species tend to proliferate quickly into new forms, having outlived many of their competitors.

But new research shows that tiny marine organisms called graptoloids did not begin to rapidly develop new physical traits until about 2 million years after competing species became extinct.

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TAGGED: Evolution, Mass Extinction

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