January 18, 2012

Children Start Swearing at 2 Years of Age

Stephanie Pappas, Live Science


AP Photo

Bleeped-out swearing may be okay for adults on TV, but what about kids? The ABC show "Modern Family" is about to find out by airing an episode this week about a foul-mouthed 2-year-old.

The show's theme already has critics at the anti-indecency Parents Television Council grumbling, but researchers who study cursing find that believe it or not, 2 years is about the age when kids really start to use "adult" language.

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TAGGED: Cursing, Children

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