August 24, 2011

Climate Change to Cause More Conflict?

Catherine Brahic, NewScientist


AP Photo

THE Peruvian highlands were hit hard by El Niño in 1982, and crops were destroyed. The same year, guerrilla attacks by the Shining Path movement erupted into a civil war that would last 20 years. Random coincidence? Possibly not.

The first study to link global climate patterns to the onset of civil conflict places El Niño on a par with factors like poverty and social exclusion.

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TAGGED: Conflicts, La Nina, Climate Change, El Nino, War

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