February 15, 2011

Rising Seas Will Affect Major U.S. Coastal Cities by 2100

Science Codex, Science Codex


Science Codex

Rising sea levels could threaten an average of 9 percent of the land within 180 U.S. coastal cities by 2100, according to new research led by University of Arizona scientists.

The Gulf and southern Atlantic coasts will be particularly hard hit. Miami, New Orleans, Tampa, Fla., and Virginia Beach, Va. could lose more than 10 percent of their land area by 2100.

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: Cities, United States, Global Warming, Rising Sea Levels

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

October 5, 2013
Global Warming Debate Isn't About Science
Dana Nuccitelli, Guardian
The 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report states with 95 percent confidence that humans have caused most, and probably all of the rapid global warming over the past 60 years. Approximately 97 percent of... more ››
October 5, 2013
$2 Trillion to Reverse Climate Change: A Bargain
Terry Barker, Conv UK
We can avoid the worst effects of climate change, say a team of Imperial College energy engineers in a recent study, and it will only cost US$2 trillion a year, at most. This sounds an unfeasibly large sum of money but in fact... more ››
The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a global coalition, has released a comprehensive study that tested proficiency in practical skills among people ages 16 to 65.  more ››
October 10, 2013
The Average American Man's Body
James Hamblin, The Atlantic
Todd is the most typical of American men. His proportions are based on averages from CDC anthropometric data. As a U.S. male age 30 to 39, his body mass index (BMI) is 29; just one shy of the medical definition of obese. At... more ››
October 7, 2013
It's My Facts vs. Your Lies
Alex B. Berezow, RealClearScience
The government shutdown has dragged a nasty skeleton out of America’s closet and put it on full display for the world to see: Americans are bitterly divided, and there is little hope on the horizon for reconciliation. more ››