February 10, 2011

Turning Bacteria's Toxins Against Themselves

Science Daily, Science Daily


Science Daily

Bacteria often attack with toxins designed to hijack or even kill host cells. To avoid self-destruction, bacteria have ways of protecting themselves from their own toxins.

Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have described one of these protective mechanisms, potentially paving the way for new classes of antibiotics that cause the bacteria's toxins to turn on themselves.

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TAGGED: Bacterial Infection, Bacteria, Toxins

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