January 24, 2011

Scientists Increasingly Vilified, Distrusted

Steve Connor, The Independent


Independent

Scientists are being subjected to shocking levels of personal vilification and distrust, Britain's most senior scientist has warned.

Sir Paul Nurse, the new president of the Royal Society, Britain's national academy of sciences, urged scientists to take on those critics who have cast doubt on the veracity of scientific discoveries ranging from the link between climate change and man-made carbon dioxide to the benefits of GM crops.

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TAGGED: Genetically Modified Crops, Genetically Modified Organisms, Global Warming, Science Journalism, Scientists

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