January 12, 2011

Phytoremediation: Plants Fight Pollution

Gaelle Dupont, Guardian


Guardian

Last year was a "pretty good" one for Phytorestore, according to CEO Thierry Jacquet. This small company is the French market leader in a promising, but still marginal sector, phytoremediation, or more simply, using plants to mitigate pollution.

"The plants are actually an alibi," says Jean-Louis Ducreux, who heads the Atelier d'Ecologie Urbaine, a consultancy specialising in these processes. "It's the bacteria attached to their roots that do the real work." The contaminants are digested...

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TAGGED: Bacteria, Plants, Pollution, Bioremediation, Phytoremediation

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