December 29, 2010

Political Views Linked to Brain Structure

Richard Alleyne, Telegraph


Telegraph

Scientists have found that people with conservative views have brains with larger amygdalas, almond shaped areas in the centre of the brain often associated with anxiety and emotions.

On the otherhand, they have a smaller anterior cingulate, an area at the front of the brain associated with courage and looking on the bright side of life.

The "exciting" correlation was found by scientists at University College London who scanned the brains of two members of parliament and a number of students.

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TAGGED: Brain Scan, Genetics, Amygdala, Brain Structure, Politics

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