September 25, 2010

China Seeks Binding Climate Treaty

Chris Buckley, Scientific American

China wants the world to seal a binding climate change treaty by late 2011,...

China seeks binding climate treaty late 2011: report A woman carrying an umbrella walks past a puddle in a bicycle lane on a rainy day in Beijing September 17, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray Image:

BEIJING (Reuters) - China wants the world to seal a binding climate change treaty by late 2011, a Chinese negotiator said in a newspaper on Friday, blaming U.S. politics for impeding talks and making a deal on global warming impossible this year.

Li Gao, a senior Chinese negotiator on climate change, said his government would remain...

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TAGGED: Kyoto Protocol, China, Climate Change, United States, South Africa, Cancun, Beijing, Negotiator

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